Bermuda triangle research paper conclusion

BERMUDA TRIANGLE, the best-known of a variety of folk names given to a triangular region of the Atlantic Ocean whose apexes are Miami, Florida; San Juan, Puerto Rico; and the island of Bermuda. Numerous ships and aircraft have disappeared in the area, the most famous being a flight of five . Navy Avenger torpedo bombers that failed to return from a routine training mission in December 1945. Other losses range from small pleasure boats to the 542-foot . Navy collier Cyclops, lost with all hands in 1918. Since the 1960s, some commentators have attributed these disappearances to powerful, mysterious forces that include UFOs, time warps, and the "lost continent" of Atlantis. Scientific and maritime authorities have consistently rejected these explanations in favor of naturalistic ones such as turbulent seas, rapidly changing weather conditions, and the errors of inexperienced sailors and pilots.

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On May 21, 1974, an OS3 aboard the USS Stribling (DD-867) steaming at 20 knots some 400 miles NNW of San Juan Puerto Rico, I was bound for Mayport, Florida and on an evening watch in CIC.
Suddenly rumors began to circulate from the radiomen. It seems we had lost all ship-to-shore voice communications, then our data links, and shortly thereafter – and even more alarming –all satellite navigation signals had been lost. Word came down from the Captain that all communications and operations personnel were not to speak with anyone about our loss of navigation and communications links, so as not to spook the crew. Later that order was extended for an indefinite period of time. Lookouts began talking about strange things outside, so I went up to the signal bridge to see for myself. Everything was incredibly still. A full moon was reflecting a great beam of light across a glassy ocean. It was beautify and surreal. Not a breath of wind was moving across the water, but the air across the deck was equally still. This was odd, because no wind across the water and our speed forward meant a 20 knot relative wind should move down the ship. No relative wind meant an equal and opposite wind vector from astern had stilled air generated by our forward motion. There was no wind … not a ripple out there … and no relative wind. How could that be; were we actually not moving, or was there no air? We could hear the rumble of the ship’s engines and see exhaust from a stack, so we were underway. We could breathe, yet no relative wind. This illogical compilation of senses was mind boggling.
Then I noticed a rain storm forming about 10 miles off the starboard beam, with tops of massive cumulus clouds illuminated by moonlight. Lightening began moving laterally through the clouds. There was no distant thunder one would expect to hear in such still conditions, just an eerie silence. As I watched, the lightening became massive yellow, orange, and reds colors rolling within the cloud. Others came out to see this strange storm and I went back down to look at the ship’s surface search radar, which routinely showed rain squalls that reflected the radar. There was nothing. There was no rain, but I had never seen clouds that high not make rain. It sure WAS a very strange night out there.
After about three hours of no communications or navigation signals, suddenly everything returned. I turned into my rack for the night, and the Stribling went on her way to Mayport. That night was a mystery for 40 years, but now I know the USS Stribling had visited the Twilight Zone, steaming by the micro wormhole that haunts the Bermuda Triangle.

Some of the writers and websites report that Taylor was confused because his compasses failed, and that is what caused Flight 19 to get lost and eventually disappear. That story, which has largely been accepted, has only added to the mystery. What kind of mysterious force, the mysteryans ask, would cause compasses to fail? What other disappearances has this strange force caused? After all, compasses, whether mechanical or fluid–filled, are known to be extremely trustworthy. Distrusting a compass could be a response for a pilot when the landmarks he sees do not tally with his compasses, especially after he has made some turns. A former Avenger instructor pilot told me how easy it was for him to deliberately disorient a pilot just by doing a few turns to see how quickly he could reorient himself. When I was a flight instructor, I discussed with my students the issue of absolutely trusting the compass before I signed for them to take their solo cross-country flights. 
Shortly after takeoff from Fort Lauderdale, the planes of Flight 19 were to perform low-level bombing practice runs at Hen and Chickens Shoals, fifty-six miles east of the Naval Station. That would involve turns and altitude changes, which can also be disconcerting, especially at diving speeds and higher g forces.

Bermuda triangle research paper conclusion

bermuda triangle research paper conclusion

Some of the writers and websites report that Taylor was confused because his compasses failed, and that is what caused Flight 19 to get lost and eventually disappear. That story, which has largely been accepted, has only added to the mystery. What kind of mysterious force, the mysteryans ask, would cause compasses to fail? What other disappearances has this strange force caused? After all, compasses, whether mechanical or fluid–filled, are known to be extremely trustworthy. Distrusting a compass could be a response for a pilot when the landmarks he sees do not tally with his compasses, especially after he has made some turns. A former Avenger instructor pilot told me how easy it was for him to deliberately disorient a pilot just by doing a few turns to see how quickly he could reorient himself. When I was a flight instructor, I discussed with my students the issue of absolutely trusting the compass before I signed for them to take their solo cross-country flights. 
Shortly after takeoff from Fort Lauderdale, the planes of Flight 19 were to perform low-level bombing practice runs at Hen and Chickens Shoals, fifty-six miles east of the Naval Station. That would involve turns and altitude changes, which can also be disconcerting, especially at diving speeds and higher g forces.

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