Harold bloom critical essays

In one chapter, in a style of analysis which resembles the work of the Frankfurt School , he examined the philosophical effects of popular music on the lives of students, placing pop music, or as it is generically branded by record companies "rock music", in a historical context from Plato’s Republic to Nietzsche ’s Dionysian longings. Treating it for the first time with genuine philosophical interest, he gave fresh attention to the industry, its target-marketing to children and teenagers, its top performers, its place in our late-capitalist bourgeois economy, and its pretensions to liberation and freedom . Some critics, including the popular musician Frank Zappa , argued that Bloom's view of pop music was based on the same ideas that critics of pop "in 1950s held, ideas about the preservation of 'traditional' white American society". [27] Bloom, informed by Socrates , Aristotle , Rousseau , and Nietzsche, explores music’s power over the human soul. He cites the soldier who throws himself into battle at the urging of the drum corps , the pious believer who prays under the spell of a religious hymn , the lover seduced by the romantic guitar , and points towards the tradition of philosophy that treated musical education as paramount. He names the pop-star Mick Jagger as a cardinal representative of the hypocrisy and erotic sterility of pop-rock music. Pop music employs sexual images and language to enthrall the young and to persuade them that their petty rebelliousness is authentic politics, when, in fact, they are being controlled by the money-managers whom successful performers like Jagger quietly serve. Bloom claims that Jagger is a hero to many university students who envy his fame and wealth but are really just bored by the lack of options before them. [28] Along with the absence of literature in the lives of the young and their sexual but often unerotic relationships, the first part of The Closing tries to explain the current state of education in a fashion beyond the purview of an economist or psychiatrist —contemporary culture's leading umpires.

I was born & raised ultra-orthodox catholic, w/mom being a born catholic & dad a convert. I was deeply religious/spiritual from a young age, but there were things in catholicism that just never made sense to me, like: virgin birth, Mary worship, gruesome obsession with 1 particular crucifixion, belief that they are actually ingesting blood & flesh from a guy dead 2,000 yrs. ago (blood prohibited in Torah), idolizing & wearing crosses, the role of the priest as mediator between person & G-d, & in particular the idea that G-d would make Himself into a human so that he could sacrifice himself TO Himself! How does that make any sense?
So, I gave it up & started a quest for "spiritual truths", which eventually led me to a study group learning Jewish Mysticism. THAT clicked. The techniques I learned WORKED. I learned to meditate & connect with G-d 1-on-1 (no priest, pope, etc.). I felt G-d pushing me towards attending synagogue, then to conversion class, & finally actually converting. That was in 1990 & no regrets.
What David says about having a Jewish soul - I totally agree! I feel certain that I have been Jewish in other lifetimes & that I DO have a Jewish soul. Oddly, my dad loved Al Jolson & I grew up hearing him sing the Kol Nidre, Hatikvah, "Cantor on the Sabbath", etc. He had a lot of respect for the Jewish people, so it must have been passed on to me as well. Now I get to sing with our High Holy Days choir & do the choral part for Kol Nidre!
It was the right decision for me, & I know that it was what G-d wanted me to do. Just listen for that "still, small voice" to guide you to where He wants you. Baruch Hashem!

This bibliography of books was derived basically by capturing and massaging the output from a FIND SUBJECT JANE AUSTEN search of an on-line library catalog, so I can blame any deficiencies on someone else! Generally I have retained only the first printing, ignoring reprints, and have only included one publisher when a book is published both in Britain and America. A slash "/" separates alternative titles that a book has been published under (or when a book has been published under both a long and a short title, the slash separates the part which is always included in the title from the part which is not). It may be more interesting to browse the subject index to this list, than this list itself.

Allan Bloom may be a conservative icon, but there is no doubt much of what he says is pretty much on the mark. All one needs to do is teach at a college for a year and find that his view of students is often on target. Also, read Chris Hedges and Dwight McDonald and you’ll find these “liberal” voices echoing Bloom. As far as “canon” goes, I resent them. The’re childish and biased. Reminds me of when I was a kid and someone asked “What’s your favorite movie?” As if out of hundreds of different genres and styles films I could name one that was my favorite. The “canon” is a guide, nothing more, nothing less.

Harold bloom critical essays

harold bloom critical essays

Allan Bloom may be a conservative icon, but there is no doubt much of what he says is pretty much on the mark. All one needs to do is teach at a college for a year and find that his view of students is often on target. Also, read Chris Hedges and Dwight McDonald and you’ll find these “liberal” voices echoing Bloom. As far as “canon” goes, I resent them. The’re childish and biased. Reminds me of when I was a kid and someone asked “What’s your favorite movie?” As if out of hundreds of different genres and styles films I could name one that was my favorite. The “canon” is a guide, nothing more, nothing less.

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