Obesity in adolescence essay

The rate of obesity among children and adolescents in the United States has nearly tripled between the early 1980s and 2000. It has however not changed significantly between 2000 and 2006 with the most recent statistics showing a level just over 17 percent. [91] In 2008, the rate of overweight and obese children in the United States was 32%, and had stopped climbing. [92] In 2011, a national cohort study of infants and toddlers found that nearly one-third of US children were overweight or obese at 9 months and 2 years old. [93] In a follow-up study, infant weight status (healthy and obese) was strongly associated with preschool weight status. [94]

A sedentary lifestyle plays a significant role in obesity. [105] Worldwide there has been a large shift towards less physically demanding work, [106] [107] [108] and currently at least 30% of the world's population gets insufficient exercise. [107] This is primarily due to increasing use of mechanized transportation and a greater prevalence of labor-saving technology in the home. [106] [107] [108] In children, there appear to be declines in levels of physical activity due to less walking and physical education. [109] World trends in active leisure time physical activity are less clear. The World Health Organization indicates people worldwide are taking up less active recreational pursuits, while a study from Finland [110] found an increase and a study from the United States found leisure-time physical activity has not changed significantly. [111] A 2011 review of physical activity in children found that it may not be a significant contributor. [112]

Abnormal uterine bleeding is common in obese adolescents who report amenorrhea, heavy menstrual bleeding, or other menstrual abnormalities. In addition to anovulation because of immaturity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–ovarian axis, abnormal uterine bleeding in obese adolescents can result from elevated levels of free estrogens due to increased peripheral aromatization of androgens to estrogens, decreased sex hormone binding globulin, and increased insulin levels that can stimulate ovarian stromal tissue production of androgens ( 23 , 24 ). Elevated peripheral estrogen disrupts normal ovulation, which results in abnormal uterine bleeding. In the rare case reports of adolescents with endometrial cancer, the clinical history typically includes 2–3 years of abnormal bleeding and obesity ( 25 , 26 ). Endometrial evaluation should be performed if medical treatment of abnormal bleeding has failed after a thorough investigation of all potential other causes and comorbid disorders ( 27 ).

The information on this website is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Child Development Institute, LLC nor Dr. Myers nor any of the editors, columnists or authors take responsibility for any possible consequences from any action taken which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine or psychology, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or mental health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider. See additional information

Obesity in adolescence essay

obesity in adolescence essay

The information on this website is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither Child Development Institute, LLC nor Dr. Myers nor any of the editors, columnists or authors take responsibility for any possible consequences from any action taken which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine or psychology, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or mental health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider. See additional information

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